Thursday, 12 April 2018

Thursday

A quick one today as I slept in until after seven - wonderful - and have quite a lot to do before my one tuition session at nine!  Not planning, thankfully, but other things.
It's another damp start to the day.  Not exactly raining, but foggy.  Goodness knows how it will turn out but I'm making no bets.  It would be lovely to see some sun though, wouldn't it?

Yesterday ended up damp and soggy all day.  Dull and boring and it does depress your spirits after a while.  I concocted some beanburgers, did some housework and some planning and generally pootled around and rather wasted my time really.  I must got more achieved today!
After tuition, the cleaner comes.  She's had to do three weeks on a Thursday and this is the last one so it will be back to Friday next week which actually suits me better.  No complaints though - having a cleaner is lovely.

In the evening, it is the second of the financial meetings.  This time it's for me but Dave will be coming along to support and advise, which is nice and reassuring.  I hate that sort of thing and, with my dyscalculia, find that the numbers sort of 'explode' in my brain and it's very hard to understand but, dear me, I did pass the 11+ over a century ago so must have some kind of mathematical ability!  I have to admit, I will be glad when it's all over.

Now I need to stir myself, have my bath, get dressed and do a bit of getting ready.  Have a lovely day!

7 comments:

Eileen T said...

Is your bean burger recipe online anywhere? I'd be very interested if it is please.

I find financial talk hard to follow sometimes so you have my sympathy. There always seems to be too many options and I always feel that a lot of the advice is conflicting ... but that may just be the way my brain works!

Joy said...

It's on my other blog, The Frugal Factor. I'll post the link here but you'd have to copy and paste, I think.

http://my30-30challenge.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/recipe-bean-burgers.html

J x

Eileen T said...

Thanks Joy

Joy said...

A pleasure - thanks for asking.
J x

galant said...

I have become better at basic maths (i.e. addition and subtraction) over the years, Joy. Now, I quite enjoy checking our bank statement and then deducting the amounts which are due to be removed before the next 'pay' cheques go in. By 'pay' cheques, I mean our pensions, of course. I failed my 11+ as I'd recently changed schools, but I passed my 13+ (which was a 2nd chance in those days) aged 12, and went to a girls' grammars school and started on my 13th birthday in the 2nd form (I was just ten days too young to go into the 3rd form, but I benefited by having that extra year in a grammar school.)

Have you watched the programme on the Doon school in India where five boys who failed their GCSEs in this country have been attending for 6 months in order to better their results? We found it interesting but a reviewer in the Telegraph said that had the boys been sent to a good (free-paying, he meant) school in this country, the results would've been much what India achieved (I won't tell you the outcome in case you haven't watched the programmes and are planning to do so.)
Margaret P

Joy said...

I remember the 13+ We had two additions to our class via that.
No, I haven't seen that series, it sounds interesting.
Were the boys taken out of their family environment?
J x

galant said...

Yes, the boys were flown to the Doon school (exclusive, fee-paying, a bit like Harrow, Radley or Eton here), away from the families, where they stayed for 6 months. There were five of them and they had one GCSE between then, and they hoped to learn sufficient academically so that they could re-take their GCSEs at the end of the 'experiment'.
Sadly, only two of them made it to the end of the 6 months, three went home early; of the two who managed to stay there for 6 montys, one was a gay lad who wanted to have surgery to become a girl (i.e. not only gay but transgender)and the other lad wanted to become a chef.
What seemed obvious to me was the attitude to education in the two different countries: here, we tend to consider education as a right (and don't always make the most of it) and in India, they didn't think of it as a right but a privilege, and their work ethic was so much stronger, i.e. that they attended school to learn. And my goodness, learn they did! The schools success rate was said to be 100%. The Indian boys also accepted the strict rules whereas our five, unused to discipline in school, simply walked out of classes, lay in bed if they felt like it, didn't bother to go for meals, and flouted the rules about alcohol and mobile phones.
It was interesting, but very sad also as, in the end, none of the boys really benefited from the experience (with the exception of one having gained more self-confidence) academically, and all of them failed their re-takes.
I also think it demonstrated, for all their bluster and bolshie-ness, boys of 16/17 are really rather immature, rather like overgrown children. Grownups they are not.
Margaret P